Sponsored

Sunday, April 16, 2017

Why The Missing Code To Your 'True Calling' Ha...

Did you know that the knowledge of who you truly are (and which career you could actually get paid to shine like a star at in this lifetime) is no further away than your own DNA - "locked in" at the exact time you were born?



Did you know that this knowledge, which you've been carrying around with you in "code form" from birth, only needs to be plugged into a special calendar to reveal it's secrets to you in pure form?



Did you know that, for over 1,750 years people used the secret code inside this calendar for deciphering who they were and where their special talents lay - but that this secret code was lost when the Roman calendar was imposed on the "New World"...which is the same one we all use today? You probably didn't know all that...but don't worry. Most of us didn't! know Why The Missing Code To Your 'True Calling' Ha...

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Valentine’s Day Romantic Gift Ideas For Celebrating Valentine’s Day and Pamper Your Loved One With a romantic Voyage Filled With Sweet Treats – OOCORP

Are you going steady with your girlfriend and want to marry her? Nothing can be more romantic than proposing marriage and proclaiming your love and commitment to her by putting a ring on her finger! Buy her a ring and propose marriage to her on Valentine’s Day. This is one awesome thing you can give your lady which is surely priceless. Read more...

Valentine’s Day Romantic Gift Ideas For Celebrating Valentine’s Day and Pamper Your Loved One With a romantic Voyage Filled With Sweet Treats – OOCORP

Sunday, December 18, 2016

Should I Date My Best friend? - Research shows that very rarely does dating your best friend turn into a lasting partnership


Have you ever heard the adage, “don’t fish off the company pier”? I remember my boss telling me this in one of my first post-college jobs. I thought it was funny, but he was serious: don’t date people you work with. The phrase could equally apply to dating a best friend. Stakes are high, and there is a greater potential for loss if you do decide to take the plunge with a BFF—you just might lose the Best and the Friend, forever.
However, this is a common problem clients ask about: should I date my best friend? In my work as a psychic and relationship coach, I’ve seen many people date their best friend, and the outcomes typically follow a couple of paths: either total failure and loss of the friendship, or success for a while, with a petering out of the relationship over time. Very rarely does dating your best friend turn into a lasting partnership. Let’s look at why.
This may sound like a complex topic, but in reality, it just means that the people we are attracted to as friends are often energetically like us. The trouble with dating friends is that over time, because of the energetic similarities, we end up matching them vibrationally. This creates kind of a neutral charge for the relationship and typically kills passion and growth. People literally just become too much alike. 
Luisa was a client in her 30s who had dated a lot but not yet found a partner. She was getting anxious about having children and really wanted to be married before she started a family. She came for a reading to find out if she should date her best friend, Warren.
“We’ve hung out for so long, and the relationship is just so easy,” she told me. “Lately I’ve been kind of looking at him like, hmmmm … and he’s always wanted to date me. Like Harry Met Sally, you know.”
Of course, Luisa has free will, and I wouldn’t tell her what to do. We did the reading, which revealed that they had been married in a past life. The relationship had lasted a long time, but they never had children. Their marriage had been typical for the time period, based on societal rules and economic need. They had no karmic contract to marry again, but Luisa thought this might be a good sign. She decided to jump in with Warren and see what happened.
I saw Luisa several months later at a social event and asked her how it was going. “It’s not,” she told me. She showed up the next week for a reading. The romance had started well because they already knew each other. But Luisa had found sex with Warren awkward. 
"I know it sounds weird,” she said, “but it was like sleeping with my brother or something. It never felt right.”
The relationship had drifted into a pattern similar to that of their friendship, which was easy, but now became underlaid by stress because they weren’t having sex. Luisa thought Warren would be a great dad, but she was unable to really see a long-term future with him. She begged me to explain what was happening.
Energetically, I could see that Luisa and Warren were simply too similar. Not that their personalities were the same, but just that they matched each other, like electrons with the same charge. It’s a difficult concept to explain, but once I mentioned it Luisa knew exactly what I meant. I told her that unless one of them changed dramatically, the relationship would probably always be more like a friendship. She didn’t want that and chose to break it off. Unfortunately, their friendship didn’t survive.
I’ve seen this pattern many times. Sometimes the couple will marry and have children, only to find three or four years later that they’re in an easy but not growthful relationship. Some people are fine with this and find ways to be stimulated outside of the marriage—sexually, emotionally, or intellectually. It can work, if people are open and willing to communicate. But most often, the relationship ends, and the friendship is never the same.
The people we attract as mates often show up in contrast or polarity to us. This isn’t quite the same as “opposites attract,” but it’s a similar concept. For those of you who have a goal to grow in your relationships, this type of connection actually has better long-term odds. Though the connection might not be as effortless, there is less chance of codependency, energy matching, or boredom.
My client June and her partner Jessica are a good example. June is the type that gives and gives and energetically likes to merge with her partners. This had gotten her into a lot of messy, co-dependent relationships in the past. A conscious choice to find someone who was in polarity to her brought Jessica into her life.
 Jessica is very independent, more type A than June, and very focused on her work. She loves June deeply and has fully opened her heart to her. But she won’t merge with June, and the two are very different energetically. They don’t have all the same friends, interests, or desires. They do have passion, regular opportunities for growth, and space to be interdependent within the relationship.
“Our relationship isn’t easy,” June said. “But it’s challenging in a good way. I have to stand on my own two feet more. And Jess has had to learn to communicate better. It’s like our places of challenge are also the places that bring out the best in us.”
Of course, people can be too dissimilar, and this doesn’t work well over time. June and Jess share some values and life goals. They agree on whether or not to parent and are respectful of each other and their differences. Can you see how this is different from the pure “opposites attract” sort of model?
Ultimately, a combination of free will and karmic contracts—like karma mates or soulmates—guides us to make our relationship choices, for better or for worse. If you are tempted to date your best friend, ask yourself why. Are you bored? Feel your clock ticking? Want to have an intimate experience (and they’re always around)? 
Sometimes love does blossom between friends, and sometimes it works. But you can also love someone deeply, and they still might not be an appropriate partner. 
If you are contemplating dating a BFF, it might be the perfect time to get objective guidance from a psychic or intuitive. Advisors on Keen can help guide you to the clarity you need to make a good decision. 

Sunday, August 17, 2014

Ifá - Home

Ifá - Home

The Yoruba belief in orisha is meant to consolidate not contradict the terms of Olódùmarè. Adherents of the religion appeal to specific manifestations of Olódùmarè in the form of those whose fame will last for all time. Ancestors and culture-heroes held in reverence can also be enlisted for help with day-to-day problems. Some believers will also consult a geomantic divination specialist, known as a babalawo (Ifá Priest) or Iyanifa (Ifá's lady), to mediate in their problems.

Saturday, August 16, 2014

Astrological signs

The concept of the zodiac originated in Babylonian and was later influenced by Hellenistic culture. According to astrology, celestial phenomena relate to human activity on the principle of "as above, so below", so that the signs are held to represent characteristic modes of expression or primary energy patterns indicating specific qualities of experience, through which planets manifest their dimension of experience.  

In Western astrologyastrological signs are the twelve 30º sectors of the ecliptic, starting at the vernal equinox (one of the intersections of the ecliptic with the celestial equator), also known as the First Point of Aries. The order of the astrological signs is AriesTaurusGeminiCancerLeoVirgoLibraScorpioSagittariusCapricornAquarius and Pisces

 In Western and Asian astrology, the emphasis is on space, and the movement of the Sun, Moon and planets in the sky through each of the zodiac signs. In Chinese astrology, by contrast, the emphasis is on time, with the zodiac operating on cycles of years, months, and hours of the day. A common feature of all three traditions however, is the significance of the Ascendant - the zodiac sign that is rising (due to the rotation of the earth) on the eastern horizon at the moment of a person's birth.


While Western astrology is essentially a product of Greco-Roman culture, some of its more basic concepts originated in Babylonia. Isolated references to celestial "signs" in Sumerian sources are insufficient to speak of a Sumerian zodiac.Specifically, the division of the ecliptic in twelve equal sectors is a Babylonian conceptual construction.
By the 4th century BC, Babylonians' astronomy and their system of celestial omens were influencing the Greek culture and, by late 2nd century BC, Egyptian astrology was also mixing in. This resulted, unlike the Mesopotamian tradition, in a strong focus on the birth chart of the individual and in the creation of horoscopic astrology, employing the use of theAscendant (the rising degree of the ecliptic, at the time of birth), and of the twelve houses. Association of the astrological signs with Empedocles' four classical elements was another important development in the characterization of the twelve signs.
The body of astrological knowledge by the 2nd century AD is described in Ptolemy's Tetrabiblos, a work that was responsible for astrology's successful spread across Europe and the Middle East, and remained a reference for almost seventeen centuries as later traditions made few substantial changes to its core teachings.
The following table enumerates the twelve divisions of celestial longitude, with the Latin names (still widely used) and the English translation (gloss). The longitude intervals, being a mathematical division, are closed for the first endpoint and open for the second - for instance, 30° of longitude is the first point of Taurus, not part of Aries. Association of calendar dates with astrological signs only makes sense when referring to Sun sign astrology.
Various approaches to measuring and dividing the sky are currently used by differing systems of astrology, although the tradition of the Zodiac's names and symbols remain consistent. Western astrology measures from Equinox andSolstice points (points relating to longest, equal and shortest days of the tropical year), while Jyotiṣa or Vedic astrologymeasures along the equatorial plane (sidereal year). Precession results in Western astrology's zodiacal divisions not corresponding in the current era to the constellations that carry similar names, while Jyotiṣa measurements still correspond with the background constellations

The twelve sector division of the ecliptic constitutes astrology's primary frame of reference when considering the positions of celestial bodies, from a geocentric point of view, so that we may find, for instance, the Sun in 23º Aries (23º longitude), the Moon in 7º Scorpio (217º longitude), or Jupiter in 29º Pisces (359º longitude). Beyond the celestial bodies, other astrological points that are dependent on geographical location and time (namely, the Ascendant, the Mid-heaven, the Vertex and the houses' cusps) are also referenced within this ecliptic coordinate system.



SignAriesTaurusGeminiCancerLeoVirgoLibraScorpioSagittariusCapricornAquariusPisces
Celestial longitude
interval (λ)
[0°, 30°[[30°, 60°[[60°, 90°[[90°, 120°[[120°, 150°[[150°, 180°[[180°, 210°[[210°, 240°[[240°, 270°[[270°, 300°[[300°, 330°[[330°, 360°[
SymbolAries.svgTaurus.svgGemini.svgCancer.svgLeo.svgVirgo.svgLibra.svgScorpio.svgSagittarius.svgCapricorn.svgAquarius.svgPisces.svg
GlossThe RamThe BullThe TwinsThe CrabThe LionThe MaidenThe ScalesThe ScorpionThe ArcherThe GoatThe Water-bearerThe Fish



For Further Reading 


 Astrology for Yourself: How to Understand And Interpret Your Own Birth Chart 



Llewellyn's Complete Book of Astrology: The Easy Way to Learn Astrology


Llewellyn's Complete Book of Astrology: The Easy Way to Learn Astrology




Sign Aries Taurus Gemini Cancer Leo Virgo Libra Scorpio Sagittarius Capricorn Aquarius Pisces Celestial longitude interval (λ) [0°, 30°[ [30°, 60°[ [60°, 90°[ [90°, 120°[ [120°, 150°[ [150°, 180°[ [180°, 210°[ [210°, 240°[ [240°, 270°[ [270°, 300°[ [300°, 330°[ [330°, 360°[ Symbol Aries.svg Taurus.svg Gemini.svg Cancer.svg Leo.svg Virgo.svg Libra.svg Scorpio.svg Sagittarius.svg Capricorn.svg Aquarius.svg Pisces.svg Gloss The Ram The Bull The Twins The Crab The Lion The Maiden The Scales The Scorpion The Archer The Goat The Water-bearer The Fish Polarity and the four elements[edit] The concept of the zodiac originated in Babylonian astrology, and was later influenced by Hellenistic culture. According to astrology, celestial phenomena relate to human activity on the principle of "as above, so below", so that the signs are held to represent characteristic modes of expression. or primary energy patterns indicating specific qualities of experience, through which planets manifest their dimension of experience. In Western astrology, astrological signs are the twelve 30º sectors of the ecliptic, starting at the vernal equinox (one of the intersections of the ecliptic with the celestial equator), also known as the First Point of Aries. The order of the astrological signs is Aries, Taurus, Gemini, Cancer, Leo, Virgo, Libra, Scorpio, Sagittarius, Capricorn, Aquarius and Pisces. In Asian astrology, the emphasis is on space, and the movement of the Sun, Moon and planets in the sky through each of the zodiac signs. In Chinese astrology, by contrast, the emphasis is on time, with the zodiac operating on cycles of years, months, and hours of the day. A common feature of all three traditions however, is the significance of the Ascendant - the zodiac sign that is rising (due to the rotation of the earth) on the eastern horizon at the moment of a person's birth. While Western astrology is essentially a product of Greco-Roman culture, some of its more basic concepts originated in Babylonia. Isolated references to celestial "signs" in Sumerian sources are insufficient to speak of a Sumerian zodiac. Specifically, the division of the ecliptic in twelve equal sectors is a Babylonian conceptual construction. By the 4th century BC, Babylonians' astronomy and their system of celestial omens were influencing the Greek culture and, by late 2nd century BC, Egyptian astrology was also mixing in. This resulted, unlike the Mesopotamian tradition, in a strong focus on the birth chart of the individual and in the creation of horoscopic astrology, employing the use of the Ascendant (the rising degree of the ecliptic, at the time of birth), and of the twelve houses. Association of the astrological signs with Empedocles' four classical elements was another important development in the characterization of the twelve signs. The body of astrological knowledge by the 2nd century AD is described in Ptolemy's Tetrabiblos, a work that was responsible for astrology's successful spread across Europe and the Middle East, and remained a reference for almost seventeen centuries as later traditions made few substantial changes to its core teachings. The following table enumerates the twelve divisions of celestial longitude, with the Latin names (still widely used) and the English translation (gloss). The longitude intervals, being a mathematical division, are closed for the first endpoint and open for the second - for instance, 30° of longitude is the first point of Taurus, not part of Aries. Association of calendar dates with astrological signs only makes sense when referring to Sun sign astrology. Various approaches to measuring and dividing the sky are currently used by differing systems of astrology, although the tradition of the Zodiac's names and symbols remain consistent. Western astrology measures from Equinox and Solstice points (points relating to longest, equal and shortest days of the tropical year), while Jyotiṣa or Vedic astrology measures along the equatorial plane (sidereal year). Precession results in Western astrology's zodiacal divisions not corresponding in the current era to the constellations that carry similar names, while Jyotiṣa measurements still correspond with the background constellations. The twelve sector division of the ecliptic constitutes astrology's primary frame of reference when considering the positions of celestial bodies, from a geocentric point of view, so that we may find, for instance, the Sun in 23º Aries (23º longitude), the Moon in 7º Scorpio (217º longitude), or Jupiter in 29º Pisces (359º longitude). Beyond the celestial bodies, other astrological points that are dependent on geographical location and time (namely, the Ascendant, the Midheaven, the Vertex and the houses' cusps) are also referenced within this ecliptic coordinate system.